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Copyright guide for Camosun College

Creative Commons License

Except where otherwise noted, this website is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 4.0 International License.

The information obtained from or through this website is provided as guidelines for using works for educational purposes and is not intended to constitute legal advice.

In Class

What is Copyright?

Copyright is a legal framework that protects creators of literary, dramatic, musical and artistic works, as well as sound recordings, performances and communication signals. This encompasses a wide range of formats including books, articles, CDs, DVDs, software, and websites. 

Copyright protection exists as soon as a work is created.

The terms of copyright protection apply differently in various countries. In Canada, copyright protection generally applies to works for the life of the creator and for 70 years, the same as in the United States and Europe. After the copyright expires, a work enters the Public Domain, although copyright protection may still apply to more recent editions, arrangements or adaptations of the work. Also don't assume that everything you find on the Internet is in the public domain just because it is publicly available. 

For more information about duration of copyright protection in Canada see the Government of Canada's Guide to Copyright 

Use of a work in Canada is governed by the Canadian rules for the duration of the copyright protection.


How can faculty encourage copyright awareness in the classroom? 

Talk about copyright, plagiarism and intellectual property in your classes.

Include copyright information on your course syllabus. The following is a sample paragraph you can use or adapt:

Print and electronic materials are protected by copyright legislation. It is your responsibility to become aware of the legal uses of copyright-protected materials and to ensure that your use of these materials complies with copyright obligations. .

Encourage and expect copyright-friendly standards for student work. Copyright-friendly assignments will:

  • cite all print and graphical/multimedia items (e.g. using APA, MLA etc.)
  • show copyright holders' information on multimedia objects = ©
  • use alternatives to copyright-protected multimedia:
    • Create your own images, sounds, videos 
    • take original photos
    • instead of "borrowing information from a website, provide a link 
    • Look for open resources, materials created with a Creative Commons license

Remind students that, although fair dealing or educational exceptions may grant the right to reproduce without permission, they do not grant the right to adapt or modify materials, nor to change the format of materials.


Fair Dealing and Course Materials

Fair dealing permits the use of a copyright-protected work without permission from the copyright owner or the payment of copyright royalties. The fair dealing exception in the Copyright Act allows you to use other people's copyright material for the purposes of research, private study, criticism, review, news reporting, education (full detail of the education exceptions can be viewed in sections  29.4 to 29.9 of the Copyright Act), satire or parody providing the use is "fair."

While fair dealing doesn’t specifically mention teaching it does mention education. The Supreme Court of Canada has also ruled that a teacher may make copies of short excerpts of copyright-protected works and distribute them to students as part of classroom instruction without prior request from the student under the fair dealing exception. 

For more detail, please check Fair Dealing page. 


Copyright and Course Materials

Depending on your class goes online or office, you may need to prepare your coursepack or D2L page.  

All coursepacks will need to be checked for copyright compliance BEFORE they are printed. Faculty will be asked to adhere closely to submission deadlines in order to ensure that students don't experience increased wait times for their materials. For further detail, please check Coursepacks page. 

Instead of being sold as coursepacks, some materials may be distributed as handouts in face-to-face classes. Handouts must be prepared in accordance with Fair Dealing Guideline of Camosun College and Canadian Copyright Law. For further detail, please check Handouts

All materials on the college's learning management system, D2L, should be prepared under Fair Dealing Guideline of Camosun College and Canadian Copyright Law. D2L materials are not required for copyright compliance check. For further detail, please check D2L page. 


Copyright Owners' right

Copyright owners have a number of legal rights, including the right to copy and translate a work and the right to communicate a work to the public by telecommunication. Certain exceptions apply to these rights that are meant to balance copyright holders' interests with broader public interests, primarily the use of works for purposes such as teaching and research.

For more detail, please check Your Copyright page.

Some content in this Copyright Basic page has been copied and adapted from a Copyright FAQ from the University of Waterloo under a Creative Commons Attribution -Noncommercial 4.0 International (CC BY-NC-SA 4.0).

What is Fair Dealing?

The Fair Dealing provision in the Copyright Act permits use of a copyright-protected work without permission from the copyright owner or the payment of copyright royalties. To qualify for fair dealing, two tests must be passed:

1. The “dealing” must be for a purpose stated in the Copyright Act;

  • Research
  • Private study
  • Criticism
  • Review
  • News reporting
  • Education
  • Satire
  • Parody

2. The dealing must be “fair.” In landmark decisions in 2004 and in 2012, the Supreme Court of Canada provided guidance as to what this test means in schools and post-secondary educational institutions. This Fair Dealing Policy applies fair dealing in non-profit K-12 schools and post-secondary educational institutions and provides reasonable safeguards for the owners of copyright-protected works in accordance with the Copyright Act and the Supreme Court.


Background Information

Effective August 31 2012, Camosun College has opted-out of any agreement with Access Copyright and will administer its own copyright procedures and controls. Many other Canadian universities and colleges made the same decision following the advice of the Association of Canadian Community Colleges (ACCC).

This decision to opt out was made in light of the Supreme Court of Canada decisions of July 12, 2012 that addressed fair dealing and the passing of the Copyright Modernization Act in June 2012. 

Camosun faculty and staff are now required to adhere to the new Fair Dealing Policy. If copyrighted material used in a coursepack, in a classroom or on D2L etc. does not meet the standards of fair dealing (excluding materials used under the public domain or creative commons license) faculty will be asked to identify an alternative resource or seek permission for use from the copyright holder and pay any associated royalties.   Assistance will be available when permission is required. If there are any immediate questions that are not addressed here please contact Copyright Advisor


Camosun College Fair Dealing Guidelines

1. Teachers, instructors, professors and staff members in nonprofit educational institutions may communicate and reproduce, in paper or electronic form, short excerpts from a copyright-protected work for the purposes of research, private study, criticism, review, news reporting, education, satire and parody.

2. Copying or communicating short excerpts from a copyright-protected work under this Fair Dealing Policy for the purpose of news reporting, criticism or review should mention the source and, if given in the source, the name of the author or creator of the work.

3. A single copy of a short excerpt from a copyright-protected work may be provided or communicated to each student enrolled in a class or course:

  • as a class handout
  • as a posting to a learning or course management system that is password protected or otherwise restricted to students of a school or post-secondary educational institution
  • as part of a course pack

4. A short excerpt means:

  • up to 10% of a copyright-protected work (including a literary work, musical score, sound recording, and an audiovisual work)
  • one chapter from a book (should be fair amount) 
  • a single article from a periodical
  • an entire artistic work (including a painting, print, photograph, diagram, drawing, map, chart, and plan) from a copyright-protected work containing other artistic works
  • an entire newspaper article or page
  • an entire single poem, short story or musical score from a copyright protected work containing other poems or musical scores
  • an entire entry from an encyclopedia, annotated bibliography, dictionary or similar reference work

5. Copying or communicating multiple short excerpts from the same copyright-protected work, with the intention of copying or communicating substantially the entire work, is prohibited.

6. Copying or communicating that exceeds the limits in this Fair Dealing Policy may be referred to a supervisor or other person designated by the educational institution for evaluation. An evaluation of whether the proposed copying or communication is permitted under fair dealing will be made based on all relevant circumstances.

7. Any fee charged by the educational institution for communicating or copying a short excerpt from a copyright protected work must be intended to cover only the costs of the institution, including overhead costs.


Fair Dealing Decision Tool

What is a Coursepack?

Coursepacks are sold through the Camosun bookstore on a cost-recovery basis. To ensure your coursepack is ready at the beginning of semester you are advised to submit your materials early. All coursepacks will need to be checked for copyright compliance BEFORE they are printed. Faculty will be asked to adhere closely to submission deadlines in order to ensure that students don't experience increased wait times for their materials. 

Coursepacks consist of four types of material:

  • material you or your Camosun colleagues have created
  • material that is in the public domain
  • open resource that holds a Creative Commons license
  • published material where the copyright is held by its creator

 Any work included in a course pack must carry a full and correct citation and the Copyright statement attached to it by the provider.  Visit the library's citation guide for assistance. Please contact the Copyright Advisor for any copyright related question. 

These types of material are handled differently. Refer to the table below for a list of these different materials.  


Types of Coursepack Materials and How to handle

Material Definition Forms Required Citation list Notes
Instructor created material

Lecture notes, course outlines, lab manuals etc. that you or your department colleagues have created

Coursepack requisition form from the Printshop

Not required

It is appropriate to cite  the use of software programs when creating images.

 © Corel Draw

Public Domain    Material where the author has been deceased for 50 years or more (e.g. Stephen Leacock died in 1944 his works entered the public domain in 1994).

Coursepack requisition form from the Printshop

Use of copyrighted materials form

Required

 
Creative Commons License 

An open resource which has been published with a Creative Commons license.

For example:  Creative Commons License

Coursepack requisition form from the Printshop

Use of copyrighted materials form

Required

Ensure you are adhering to the terms of the specific CC license

Copyrighted material short excerpts

A short excerpt is defined by the college's fair dealing guidelines.

Coursepack requisition form from the Printshop

Use of copyrighted materials form

Required

Copyright notice stickers are available in the Printshop or from the Copyright Advisor

If an article or excerpt exceeds the limits of fair dealing, Please contact the Copyright Advisor


Using Students created materials

On Commercialization of Intellectual Property (Camosun College Policy E-3.5), the College states the Ownership of Intellectual Property Guidelines.

Here's the guidelines for the students.

"Students own intellectual property in works developed as part of their normal course requirements, subject to any employment or other obligations between the student and the College, or any external parties that sponsor or support the student in the development of the intellectual property. The College shall have a right to use works developed by students in perpetuity for institutional, commercially non-competitive purposes and may retain prototypes or other original work developed by students using College resources." - Commercialization of Intellectual Property

Therefore, 

  • students own copyrights of their works during the classes at Camosun.
  • However, the college have a right to use the works.

You can also use students' works under Fair Dealing guidelines without permission (as news, journal articles or short stories). In this case, you must attribute the source and fill up Use of copyrighted materials form

If you want to use students' works anonymously and revise it, the best option would be getting a written permission. 

College doesn't have any specific "forms" for the permission since it is already addressed on our policies. 

If you have any questions or need clarification please contact Copyright Advisor


Consider alternatives to paper coursepacks:


Creating a List of Copyrighted Materials Page

When you use materials which you have not created (e.g. copyrighted, public domain, creative commons) in your coursepack, you must attribute the source of materials. Therefore, every coursepacks must includes the List of Copyrighted Materials page. Simply, if you didn't write it-cite it!

This list should be the first sheet in your coursepack. Any academic citation format will do. That means you can use your preferred citation style (APA, MLA, Chicago etc...) to produce the list.

At the top or bottom of the list page, you need to place the following prominent notice:

© “This coursepack may contain short excerpts of copyrighted material. The copy is made solely for your personal use for research, private study, criticism or review only. Further reproduction, distribution, transmission, dissemination, or any other uses, may be an infringement of copyright if done without securing the permission of the copyright owner.”

You can either use the template below to create the List of Copyrighted Materials page or put the notice sticker on your existing citation pages. 

The citations page must include the following for each excerpt that will be used:

  • the publisher,
  • the artist or illustrator of any artistic work reproduced (where known)
  • the author or authors (where known)
  • pages used
  • the international copyright symbol © 

Examples:

© Susan Armitage, Making Connections: Gender, Race and Place in Oregon Country, Elizabeth Jameson and Sheila McManus, eds. One Step Over the Line: Toward a History of Women in the North.

© Schwartz, D.L. & Bransford, J.D. (1998). A time for telling. Cognition and Instruction, 14(4), 475-522.


Use of Copyrighted Materials Form

Camosun College recommends our instructors to fill up Use of Copyrighted materials forms for materials which you have not created (e.g. copyrighted, public domain, creative commons) in your coursepack. 

  • Fill out one form per work you wish to use.
  • These forms will need to be re-submitted each time you use the materials in a coursepack.

Please use the link below to download the form. 


Coursepack Submission Checklist

When you are ready to submit your coursepack for printing. You must include:

  • A clean copy of all the material you want printed
  • Citation/Attribution list of copyrighted materials OR
  • Table of contents with detailed copyright materials (your choice)
  • Use of Copyright Materials form for each article, book excerpt you will be using (one form per work)
  • A completed Bookstore Coursepack Requisition Form

Please remember-you CANNOT charge a department royalty if you have material in your coursepack that was created by someone else. Only coursepacks that contain 100% original work can apply a department royalty. This includes charts, tables and diagrams.

Also, you CANNOT re-format, re-type or otherwise alter a copyrighted work without the express permission of the copyright holder.


Submission Due Dates

SPRING/SUMMER TERM

             MARCH 15th

FALL TERM

             MAY 15th

WINTER TERM

             OCTOBER 15th

What is D2L?

The college's learning management system, D2Lcan be used as a platform to organize your course readings.

Since D2L is computer based, you have choice of using variety of multimedia as well as printed materials of your coursepack.

For example:

  • material you or your Camosun colleagues have created
  • material that is in the public domain
  • open resource that holds a Creative Commons license
  • published material where the copyright is held by its creator 
    • Images from Books, Internet etc.
    • Scanned copy of a short excerpt
    • Material from library's electronic resources
    • PowerPoint slides either prepared by you or provided by publisher
    • Videos
    • Links

The table below details how you can use various resources within D2L. 

For more information and training regarding D2L, please check eLearning Tutorials at Camosun.


Types of D2L Materials and How to handle

Please ensure you must follow Fair Dealing Guideline of Camosun College for all materials on D2L. 

Material What you need to do
Open resource with Creative Commons license
  • Attribute the source and follow its CC license
  • Provide details of type of CC license

Public domain material

  • Attribute the source
Images from books, internet etc.
  • Attribute the source
    • DO NOT use Google search result page as original source
  • Ensure the use of the image is within parameters of fair dealing
  • Include the following statement:

©“ This is solely for your personal use for research, private study, criticism or review only. Further reproduction, distribution, transmission, dissemination, or any other use, may be an infringement of copyright if done without securing the permission of the copyright owner. You may not distribute, e-mail or otherwise communicate these materials to any other person”

Scanned copy of a short excerpt
  • Attribute the source
  • Include the following statement:

©“This is solely for your personal use for research, private study, criticism or review only. Further reproduction, distribution, transmission, dissemination, or any other use, may be an infringement of copyright if done without securing the permission of the copyright owner. You may not distribute, e-mail or otherwise communicate these materials to any other person”

  • I​​​​​​f a scanned copy exceeds short excerpt definition, please contact Copyright Advisor for assistance. 
Material from library's electronic resources
  • Persistent links to library electronic resources are generally acceptable
  • Some resources allow posting of a PDF of the article. Check with a librarian if you want to post a PDF copy.

PowerPoint slides from lectures

  • If you have used copyrighted materials in your slides (e.g. images) make sure you attribute the source and ensure fair dealing guidelines have been met
PowerPoint slides provided by publisher
  • Slides can only be posted to D2L if the textbook has been adopted with permission from its publisher
  • Contact Copyright Advisor for assistance

Videos & Music

  • Provide a link to the original source
  • If a video provider allows embedding, you may embed the video
  • Copyrighted materials should not be uploaded on Kaltura
  • Contact the Copyright Advisor for assistance

Links

  • Linking to material on the internet is an acceptable practice
Alternate Formats

For more information about locating permalinks for library resources, refer to the Persistent Link page of our Troubleshooting E-resources guide.

What are Licensed Resources?

Camosun College Library, individually and through consortia, signs licensing agreements with vendors and publishers for access to electronic resources such as databases and eJournals.

Each resource has its own licensing agreement. Generally speaking, all electronic resource licenses do not allow:

  • systematic downloading, for example entire volumes or issues of journals or entire books
  • use of robots, crawlers or similar software applications to capture data
  • resale or commercial use

Some licenses permit use in course packs and/or the creation of persistent links for insertion into an online course website such as D2L. Some licenses do NOT (for example, Harvard Business Review). 

The terms of any license take precedence over the Fair Dealing Policy. If you are unsure of the terms of use for an item contact the Library.


Online Database Permissions

1. Course Packs - Any work included in a course pack must carry a full and correct citation and the Copyright statement attached to it by the provider. Visit the library's citation guide for assistance.

2. Persistent Links - If you want to share an article, ebook, or chapter with other Camosun users, persistent URLs make it simple for the receiver to get to the document.  A persistent URL or link is the web address of the document you want to share. You can copy and paste them into an email or a webpage.

The information in this table is quite brief, if you need more detailed information, please contact the library.

Database
Use in Coursepacks
Persistent Links
Academic Search Complete
No
  • In the full record, labelled “Persistent link to this record”.
Access Science
No
  • No
Alt Health Watch
No
  • In the full record, labelled “Persistent link to this record”.
Applied Science Index

Yes

(a single article from an issue of a journal)

  • In the full record, labelled “Persistent URL”.
ARTstor
No
  • Choose the Article Information link in the citation and find the “Stable URL”.  To ensure it works off campus insert the prefix:

    https://libsecure.camosun.bc.ca:2443/login?url=
Berkshire Encyclopedia of World Sport
Yes
  • In the Full text version (not PDF), after the References, the end of the “Source Citation” gives the link. To ensure it works off campus insert the prefix:

    https://libsecure.camosun.bc.ca:2443/login?url=
Biological and Agricultural Index

Yes

(a single article from an issue of a journal)

  • In the full record, labelled “Persistent URL”.
Biomedical Reference Collection
No
  • In the full record, labelled “Persistent link to this record”.
BC Stats Secure
No
  • No
Business Source Complete
No
  • In the full record, labelled “Persistent link to this record”.
Canadian Reference Center
No
  • In the full record, labelled “Persistent link to this record”.
Canadian Newsstand
No
  • In the full record, labelled “Document URL”.
CBCA (incl. Business and Reference)
No
  • In the full record, labelled “Document URL”.
CINAHL

Yes

(a single article from an issue of a journal)

  • In the full record, labelled “Persistent link to this record”.
Consumer Health Complete
No
  • In the full record, labelled “Persistent link to this record”.
Criminology - from Sage

Yes

(a single article from an issue of a journal)

  • Choose “View Record”, copy the “DOI ”. Add it to this url:

    https://libsecure.camosun.bc.ca:2443/login?url= http://www.csa.com/htbin/getfulltext.cgi?username=camos&access=camos99&db=sagecrim-set-c&mode=pdf&doi=
     
  • Make sure there are no line breaks in the finished link.
EBMR: Evidence Based Medicine
Yes
  • In Full Text, choose Email Jumpstart link. The body of the email will contain the link that article.  To ensure it works off campus insert the prefix:

    https://libsecure.camosun.bc.ca:2443/login?url=
ERIC
No
  • In the full record

What are Alternatives to Copyright?

Not every materials are copyright protected. There are many alternative choices you can use which give you more flexibility and less restrictions than copyrighted materials. Most popular alternatives are:

  • Public Domain
  • Creative Commons
  • Open Access
  • Linking

Public Domain

Refers to works in which copyright has either expired or where the copyright owner has clearly specified that the work may be used without their explicit permission. Copyright protection may still apply to more recent editions, arrangements or adaptations of works in the public domain since copyright on public domain material is created when new content (footnotes, critiques, etc.) is added to the original material.

Each county has different copyright protection period. For example, Canada is life + 70, but New Zealand is life + 50. If there is some Public Domain materials on your course materials and you are expecting some students accessing D2L from any foreign county, please contact Copyright Advisor

Further Detail: Copyright Term and Canada's Public Domain Chart, prepared by the Copyright Office at the University of Alberta / CC BY 4.0

Where to find public domain works:


Creative Commons

Creative Commons (CC) is a nonprofit organization that helps overcome legal obstacles to the sharing of knowledge and creativity to address the world’s pressing challenges.

CC provides Creative Commons licenses and public domain tools that give every person and organization in the world a free, simple, and standardized way to grant copyright permissions for creative and academic works; ensure proper attribution; and allow others to copy, distribute, and make use of those works. 


License Elements
Image Condition Description

BY

(Attribution)

Credit must be given to the creator

SA

(Share Alike)

Adaptations must be shared under the same terms

NC

(Non Commercial)

Only noncommercial uses of the work are permitted

ND

(No Derivatives)

No derivatives or adaptations of the work are permitted

Some content in this guide has been copied and adapted from Creativecommons.org licensed under Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International (CC-BY 4.0)


Types of Creative Commons Licenses

From: How To Attribute Creative Commons Photos by Foter, licensed under CC BY SA 3.0


How to attribute?

For example:

                How To Attribute Creative Commons Photos by Foter, licensed under CC BY SA 3.0

                Table by Foter / CC BY-SA

  • Title (or keyword for hyperlink)
  • Author
  • Source
  • License

About Open Access

Open Access (OA) refers to scholarly literature that is freely available on the Internet.

These resources are sustained by the academic and scientific communities that produce them. They are typically found in peer-reviewed Open Access Journals and Institutional Repositories, which act as archives of institutions' scholarly output.

 

The library maintains a guide that outlines sources for open education resources, open access journals and books, and sources of open culture (images, video etc.). Open Resources Guide


Who benefits from Open Access

Researchers

  • Increases the visibility, readership and impact of author’s works
  • Creates new avenues for discovery in a digital environment
  • Enhances interdisciplinary research

Educational Institutions

  • Contributes to the core mission of advancing knowledge
  • Ensures all students have access to research, rather what they (or their school) can afford
  • Contributes to a better-educated workforce

Businesses

  • Access to cutting-edge research encourages innovation
  • Stimulates new ideas, new services, new products

Public

  • Provides access to previously unavailable materials relating to health, energy, environment, and other areas of broad interest
  • Creates better educated populace

* Content on this page has been copied and adapted from Why Open Access? (SPARC)


Legitimate Open Access

The legality of open access materials is determined by the copyright holder. Some of the way holders can choose to disclose their material include a Creative Commons license, copyright free or Conditional Open Access. Unless the owner has set up the material as Open Access, it remains as copyrighted material in any circumstance until it comes to the public domain. 

Various Academic services claim themselves as Open Access and their resources are legal. However, many of these services allow their users to upload materials and share. During this process, there is no permission or consent involved from its copyright holders. As a result of this, these sites are essentially File-sharing for books and articles, and are likely to be breaking copyright. 

Camosun College supports legitimate Open Resources, but we do not support file-sharing sites which can break copyright.

Linking

One of the most recommended way to use copyrighted materials in your class is linking. Instead of copy and paste copyrighted materials without permission, you may put a hyperlink of the material on D2L. This won't be cons


idered as copyright infringement in Canada. 

What kinds of exceptions are there in Canadian Copyright Law?

Copyright protects not only the creators' rights but also the users' rights. If copyright law is written too favorably to copyright holders, it will restrict users' rights and limit the goal of sharing knowledge across society. Therefore, there are always exceptions in copyright. For example, Canadian Copyright Law includes Fair dealing provision to protect users right. There are various exceptions more than Fair Dealing. 


Non-commercial user generated content (mash-ups)

A person may use an existing work which has been published or otherwise made available to the public in the creation of a new work, provided:

  • The source of the existing work is given where reasonable
  • The existing work was legally acquired
  • The new work is for non-commercial purposes
  • The new work does not have a substantial adverse effect (financial or otherwise) on a current or potential market for the existing work

Copyright Act, Section 29.21


Back-up copies

A person may reproduce the source copy of a work they own or have licensed, provided: 

  • The source copy was legally acquired
  • The person does so solely for back-up purposes in case the source copy is lost, damaged or otherwise rendered unusable
  • The person does not share the reproduction
  • The person, while making the production, does not break a technological protection measure, such as a digital lock

Copyright Act, Section 29.24


Reproduction of a broadcast for later listening or viewing

A person may record a program for the purpose of listening to or viewing it later, provided the person:

  • Receives the program legally
  • Does not break a digital lock in order to record the program
  • Makes no more than one recording of the program
  • Keeps the recording no longer than is reasonably necessary in order to listen to or view the program at a more convenient time
  • Does not give the recording away and uses it only for private purposes

Copyright Act, Section 29.23


Reproduction for private purposes

A person may reproduce a work, for a private purpose, provided:

  • The copy of the work from which the reproduction is made is not an infringing copy
  • The person legally acquired the copy of the work (other than by borrowing it or renting it) and owns or is authorized to use the medium or device on which it is reproduced
  • The person did not break a digital lock in order to make the reproduction
  • The person does not give the reproduction away

Copyright Act, Section 29.22


Additional exceptions (selected)

The following sections of the Copyright Act list other user's rights:

Exception

Section

Persons with perceptual disabilities Section 32
News reporting of a public lecture Section 32.2(1)(c)
Public reading of an excerpt from a copyright-protected work Section 32.2(1)(d)
Use of a commissioned photograph Section 32.2(1)(f)
Religious, educational, or charitable performance  Section 32.2(3)
Private music copying  Section 80

For a concise overview of exceptions to owners' rights for individuals, see pages 84-86 of Canadian Copyright: A Citizen's Guide (2nd ed.) (Murray & Trosow, 2013)

Adapted from Exceptions in Copyright Acts from Langara College under a Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 4.0 International License.

Multimedia in Class

You have variety choice of using media materials in your class for online and offline. 

  • Video (DVD, Online etc.)
  • Audio (CD, Online etc.)
  • Broadcasting (TV, Radio, Streaming etc.)
  • Images

If you have any question regarding using multimedia materials in class, please contact Ally Flynn (Media Librarian).


Using Images

Most of images on the Internet are copyrighted that means you have to follow the same rules as other copyrighted materials when you use images on your course packs or D2L. 

Here's little more details when you use images from the Internet. 

  • For Coursepack use, fill up Use of Copyright Materials form for each images you will be using (one form per work). Please provide a permanent address of each images. Google search results are not a permanent address. 
  • Please add a Photo Credit Line under the every images on your course packs or D2L, as part of the caption or elsewhere in the page. For example, 
    • © Corel Draw
    • Photo by John Doe
    • Image courtesy of the Library of Congress
  • List the permanent addresses on the List of copyrighted material pages. 

If you have any questions or need clarification please contact Copyright Advisor


Find Copyright Free Images

These websites provide copyright-friendly images you can use freely as long as you abide by any terms of use provided by the owner of the content. 


Useful Resources

What are Alternate Formats?

Alternate Formats are different formats (either printed or electric) of primary documents. The goal of Alternate formats is to guarantees an equal access and opportunity to the information for everyone. Providing alternative formats makes content more accessible for everybody, including individuals with a disability. 

Some common alternate formats are:

  • Electronic Text (Word, PDF, PowerPoint, etc.)
  • Large Print
  • Closed Captioning
  • Digital Audio (e.g. MP3)
  • Braille

Legal background of creating alternate formats

Copyright Act Canada Section 32 (1) permits making alternative format copies of copyrighted materials (such as Literary, dramatic, artistic and musical works, EXCEPT cinematographic) for individuals of perceptual disabilities. 

32 (1) It is not an infringement of copyright for a person with a perceptual disability, for a person acting at the request of such a person or for a non-profit organization acting for the benefit of such a person to

(a) reproduce a literary, musical, artistic or dramatic work, other than a cinematographic work, in a format specially designed for persons with a perceptual disability;

(a.1) fix a performer’s performance of a literary, musical, artistic or dramatic work, other than a cinematographic work, in a format specially designed for persons with a perceptual disability;

(a.2) reproduce a sound recording, or a fixation of a performer’s performance referred to in paragraph (a.1), in a format specially designed for persons with a perceptual disability;

(b) translate, adapt or reproduce in sign language a literary or dramatic work, other than a cinematographic work, in a format specially designed for persons with a perceptual disability;

(b.1) provide a person with a perceptual disability with, or provide such a person with access to, a work or other subject-matter to which any of paragraphs (a) to (b) applies, in a format specially designed for persons with a perceptual disability, and do any other act that is necessary for that purpose; or

(c) perform in public a literary or dramatic work, other than a cinematographic work, in sign language, either live or in a format specially designed for persons with a perceptual disability.

Limitation

(2) Subsection (1) does not apply if the work or other subject-matter is commercially available, within the meaning of paragraph (a) of the definition commercially available in section 2, in a format specially designed to meet the needs of the person with a perceptual disability referred to in that subsection.


ALLY on D2L

Camosun College has added the tool Ally into our D2L sites. Depending on what the original file format is, Ally will automatically generate the following alternative formats to support you during your program and courses on D2L. 

  • Tagged PDF (e.g. structural elements like headings, bullets, form-fields, etc. are clearly labelled as such)
  • HTML
  • ePub
  • Electronic braille
  • Audio (MP3)

Ally can only provide alternative formats for files that have been uploaded into the Course Content; it cannot create alternative formats of content on external websites that are linked from the Content.

These Alternative formats are for your personal use only; you may not copy, post or share the alternative format with others

For more information regarding ALLY on D2L, please contact Sue Doner


Centre for Accessible Learning

For Instructors

Creating an inclusive and accessible learning environment requires the work of the entire college community. The Centre of Accessible Learning provides direct supports to students and is also committed to helping faculty learn more about disability services.

Contact

Phone

  • Lansdowne: 250-370-3312

  • Interurban: 250-370-4049

Email

Further detail: Centre for Accessible Learning

Important Forms